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Purchasing a Flight to Paris and Reserving a Hotel – Planning for January

Purchasing a Flight to Paris and Reserving a Hotel – Planning for January

Now that the month is decided and any weekend looks good, I start trying to pin down the exact dates.  Five nights and over a weekend provides a good reference to plug in dates to search for a Paris hotel and Paris flights.  On websites, I check for special offers at hotels and then search a variety of dates for the Paris flights.  Also, I begin looking at what will be happening in Paris to see if something is a must see or must do.

None of this is scientific.  And, I do not know whether it is the best way to secure the least expensive or best deal on flights and hotels.  This is just the way I start looking.  No matter what time of year, Paris is a popular destination.  Once when I was trying to use miles for a ticket, an airline representative told me that when Paris flights open for booking, mileage reward flights are exhausted on the first day.  Insane!

This part is a lot of work.  However, these will be the two major expenses and major decisions for the trip, so take a few days to figure it out.  My eyes go blurry after a while looking at airline schedules and checking back and forth between websites.  And, I want to telephone a travel agent and see what kind of price she or he can get for me.

Looking for A Paris Hotel for January

I am stuck in a rut when choosing a Paris hotel.  I like being in the middle of the 6th Arrondissement.  It is lively, easy to walk to boulangeries, wine stores, restaurants, the Seine.  But, the Ile St. Louis is also fun and easy.  Not as close to a Metro, but at night the tourists are gone and it is a little neighborhood.  Both have narrow streets and, although a lot of tourists, they each still feel like a neighborhood.

So I check the Paris hotels I know first.  It doesn’t look like any of the dates in January are better than others.  And, the prices seem kind of high for January.  I don’t know what is up with that.  January is definitely off-season!  Maybe I am too early?  Doubt that.  Then, I telephoned a few traveling friends and they all said January was one of their favorite times in Paris, too!  Crazy.  But, few tourists, romantic weather…..

Have never stayed at Hotel Brighton, but the views look terrific.  It is close to a Metro stop and would have easy access to taxis or ride hailing services.  Not very neighborhoody in the sense of small streets…  But, the rooms on the rue de Rivoli side would have a lot of light at that time of year and could have amazing views over the Tuileries and off to the Eiffel Tower.  The view, the price and maybe breakfast thrown in would be the biggest draw for this hotel.  Plus, Place Vendôme is around the corner – window shopping.  Hmmm?

Looking for Paris Flights

For the airlines, I take into consideration the weather – here in the United States.  Departing for Europe from cities in the north in January can be a disaster.  I do not want to be one of those poor souls stuck in an airport during a blizzard.  Meanwhile, the south doesn’t necessarily escape winter weather either.  Ice storms and a dusting of snow can shut down Atlanta or Dallas/Ft. Worth.  I have had good luck taking my chances with Atlanta, because AirFrance leaves out of there with direct Paris flights.

Airfares for Paris flights through Houston, Dallas/Ft. Worth and Atlanta seem okay.  No discounted fares are popping up.

And, right now, one U.S. Dollar is equal to 1.14 Euros.  So, that part is not bad.  Of course, parity would be better!

AirFrance planes immediately put you in the French spirit.  The flight attendants are French, the first language on the signs and in the videos is French, and the food is French!  Bonjour!  And, Monsieur, let me help you to your seat!

One app that could be helpful if you are checking out prices is Hopper.  It predicts demand and rates.

Looking for Paris Events

When looking for events and exhibitions, I kind of run through a list of places in my head and search their internet sites for what will be happening.  Most of the time, it is pretty easy to tell whether or not something really catches my eye and is a definite must see event.

The Louvre is presenting a Hittite exhibit – that could be really interesting.  But the exhibit doesn’t start until April of 2019, so will miss that.  Nothing really grabbing my attention at Musee d’Orsay, Grand Palais doesn’t have a calendar up that far in advance.  Petit Palais, no.  Pompidou, no.

Hey, that is all OKAY!  Nothing that is pulling me, so I can go back to some favorites, or take a look at something I have never seen!

Opéra Bastille is presenting Les Troyens toward the end of the month.  That was the first opera I saw in Paris back in 1990!  And, that is when the lead tenor was booed off the stage!  I had no idea what was happening.  French audiences do not say “boo,” they say, “huée” (kind of like, “who-ay” or something close to that).  Supposedly, many performers refuse to take a gig in Paris because the audiences are so discerning!  But, if the performer is great, the claps and love will go on and on.  Shirley Verrett experienced that love on that same night as the tenor was sent packing.

Learning French

Each time the ticket is booked, I pull out a French textbook and go through the same basics that I go through each time.  Can’t these lessons stick in my head?  Maybe I will try sleeping with it under my pillow – won’t that work?

Not Yet

Okay, haven’t pulled the trigger on any Paris hotel or Paris flights – yet.  Still mulling over everything.

Planning to Go to Paris Again

Planning to Go to Paris Again

After talking about it and writing about it so much, and realizing I need many more digital photos for Paris with Scott, it is time to go again.

During this whole experience, I will write entries for every part of the process – planning, going and returning.   It will be an example so that someone interested in doing the same thing can kind of see how one traveler (Scott, in particular) does it.

How the Process Begins

First, I talk with John A. and he agrees it is time to go again.  We talk in general about a time of year to go.  It is the height of summer right now and we are not going in the next month.  So what about sometime in October or November?  Cooler weather – a big bonus!

The fall is perfect because it is cooler.  Any heat at all, and even in the cold, I sweat.  It is not a problem at home because I can just keep showering, changing clothes and do all the laundry I need.  But, out of the country, not so much.  (These are important things to consider when planning a trip!  Seriously, check out the Self-Assessment in So You Want to Go to Paris.)  As a result, the fall is a great time to go again and the cooler the better for me.

How Long?

Second, I want to include a weekend since I have a full-time j-o-b and I will have to take off work for some days.  But, this will not be a two weekend and week in the middle trip.  Only long enough to recharge on Paris, escape to the most beautiful city on the earth for a few days, and get some work done for this site!  Five nights will be long enough to go again.  Of course, I want to go for much longer.  But, five nights will do.

Is the Calendar Open?

Now, I start looking at the calendar and marking out dates.  I have to take into account the LSU football schedule.  I would rather not miss the home games, so I have them all on the calendar already and it is easy to see what dates are not that great.

Then, there is Thanksgiving which kind of takes out the two weekends on either side.  And, the trip should not be too close to Thanksgiving, because there is a lot going on then.  But, I need a little time to make plans, so maybe middle to late October would be good.

Seems perfect for me, but then asked a few friends about going as well, and middle to late October didn’t really work for them.  Then, I forgot a niece is coming in town then, and… there are too many obstacles.  November is out for the friends as well.  So, I skip December because that is already busy for me and move along to 2019!!!!!  January could be the time.

To Go Again in Winter

January may not seem like a great time to go.  But the cold and the potential rain and the limited daylight is fine with me.  It is when I began six months of school there, so I think it is a great time.  Honestly, any time of the year in Paris is perfect for me.  A couple of friends say okay to January.  And, unless your team is in the playoffs for the Super Bowl, and who knows about that, it seems like the month is wide open on the calendar.

Great, January it is!  And, since the entire month is free, I start looking at airlines and hotels to see if I can find any differences in price.  In other words, maybe a discounted rate on one weekend versus another.  Also, I check some of the museums for any shows that may really entice me.  And, I check the opera schedule to see if a performance is a must see for me.

What To Do When It Is Raining in Paris

What To Do When It Is Raining in Paris

First, stop and take stock when it is raining in Paris.  Try to assess how much rain it is going to be.  A whole day of rain?  Or, only a brief shower?  A deluge or a drizzle?   If it is supposed to rain all day long, then you may want to adjust your schedule.  If it is only a sprinkle, keep going full speed ahead with the day as planned.

Most importantly, take a deep breath and remember, rain is not the end of the world.  It will not ruin your vacation.  Paris does not close up when it rains.  Open top bus tours still run – put on a poncho.

If it really is going to rain all day long, see if you can find some inexpensive water proof shoes and take an umbrella and explore.  Paris in a drizzle is one of my favorite times.  The colors seem to become saturated on buildings, trees, park benches, grass, the cars….  The gray clouds make the ancient buildings even more enticing.  The narrow streets in the Marais are even more inviting.

But, if it is raining and umbrellas are everywhere, avoid busy rush hour foot traffic.  Eyes are a precious commodity that shouldn’t be poked with umbrella tips.  Between 5:30-6:30 – go take a rest back at the hotel, or rejuvenate with coffee at a cafe.

The most logical place to go when it is raining in Paris is to visit a big museum – like the Louvre.  A big museum has exhibits, shopping, food and drink.  And, it can be a good idea, depending on the time of year.  But, everyone else is thinking the same thing.  So the big museums will be mobbed with people trying to avoid the water.  Besides traditional museums, here are a few suggestions for things to do in Paris when it is raining.

An Unusual Museum Visit

Weren’t thinking of the Musée de la Chasse et Nature?  Well, a rainy day may change your mind.  Pull out your guidebook and look up museums.  Choose one or two that you never thought you would visit.  Take a chance.  The worst thing is that you go, take a look, leave and go back out into the rain.  However, the upside is you may see something incredible, take in important architecture and history – and have fun – while dry.

Catacombs

when it is raining in Paris visit the catacombs

Nearly 70 feet below the surface, Paris has an extensive network of underground passages that were once limestone quarries.  From the late 1700s until the mid-1800s, millions of human bones were exhumed from cemeteries and moved into these subterranean quarries.  Although the official website states that the “tour is unsuitable for people with heart or respiratory problems,” and “those of a nervous disposition and young children,” it is a dry place to explore an interesting part of Paris’ history.  Les Catacombes de Paris:  1, avenue du Colonel Henri Rol-Tanguy, 75014; Métro:  Denfert-Rochereau; Closed Mondays, check the website for more details.

Sewer Museum

sewer musuem when it is raining in Paris

Paris Sewer Museum; Photo by: ignis, Musée des Égouts de Paris, CC BY-SA 3.0

Engineering wonders lurk beneath all cities, but Paris displays its sewers in grand style – in a museum, no less.  When it is raining in Paris, take a tour through the tunnels that not only serve as sewers, but also provide the passageways for internet and phone cables, tubes that run between post offices (like at the bank teller line) and pipes filled with drinking water.  In the past, tourists were ferried through in boats and suspended carts.  Now, admire the amazing workings on foot.  The museum also boasts a gift shop!  Musée des Égouts de Paris; Near the bridge, Pont de l’Alma, across the street from 93 quai d’Orsay, 75007; Métro: Alma-Marceau; or RER:  Pont de l’Alma.

Watch a Movie

Parisians are devoted fans of cinema.  As a result, movie theaters dot the city.  Even the avenue des Champs-Élysées is full of movie theaters.  Don’t look for a megaplex like you see in the suburbs.  These movie houses will have a sign on the street advertising the current films.  Once you pass the entrance, then you may find multiple theaters.  Many American movies are shown at the theater with French subtitles.  So, head in during a downpour and enjoy hearing your mother tongue.

Shopping at Galeries Lafayette and Printemps

Wide canopies of Printemps

Wide Canopies of Printemps where you can duck out of the rain; Photo by Minato ku, BoulHaussNoel, CC BY 3.0

These department stores feature MANY departments!  For the dedicated shopper, when it is raining in Paris, it is a shopping day in Paris.  If you do not find what you are looking for in one, walk down the street and look in the other one.  Another bonus on a rainy day is that much of the sidewalk around the two behemoths is covered.  So don’t fret too much about getting your packages wet.  Also, both have amazing architecture inside and out plus full service cafés for eating, resting and re-loading on caffeine and hot chocolate.  Rest and retail therapy all under two roofs – barely a block away from each other.

Cooking Class

Want to learn some basics, make pastries or cook a meal while in Paris?  When it is raining may be good time to do it.  Many places offer cooking classes for real beginners as well as advanced cooks.  A great part about taking a cooking class is that you get to eat what you cook!  And, the classes are indoors.  Start looking at options now so if it does rain, you can have a list ready to book online or ask the concierge to help you book on the day you want one.  La Cuisine Paris (or The Paris Kitchen) gets rave reviews.  Check it out here. https://lacuisineparis.com

Long Lunch at a Nice Restaurant

When it is raining in Paris, or scheduled to rain for a good chunk of mid-day, reserve a spot at a fancy restaurant.  This is your chance to take advantage of the “down” time outdoors to relish a long lunch.  All without feeling guilty about not doing other things.  Enjoy the pampering and delicious foods at reduced lunch time prices.

Vist Parapluies Simon When It Is Raining In Paris!

parapluies simon

Forgot your umbrella?  No worries.  Make a special trip to Parapluies Simon and find a souvenir when it is raining in Paris.  This umbrella store on Boulevard St. Michel in the 6th is full of specialty rain protectors and also takes custom orders.  Find out more.

River Cruise

Yes, when it is raining in Paris, take a covered river cruise.  It can be FUN in the rain.  Even if it is pouring, you will stay dry, hear the pounding rain (no chance of hearing the tour guide on the loud speaker), scream to hear each other and still be able to have some great views.  Plus, it will be even more memorable because you will have a fun story to tell of taking the boat in the pouring rain.

And, Last But Not Least

A friend wrote and said “After all, Paris is the most incredibly romantic city.”  So, hang the “Do Not Disturb” (Ne Pas Déranger) sign on the door knob outside your room and enjoy Paris in a very intimate way while the rain is falling on the window panes.

How To Tell If A Parisian Hotel Is Green

How To Tell If A Parisian Hotel Is Green

Many Parisian hotels are working toward green and sustainable goals.  In order to reach those goals, and outwardly demonstrate their sustainability commitment, hotels will join a group of like-minded organizations that adhere to similar goals.  These organizations provide check lists and confirmations that the hotel is meeting the outlined goals for sustainability.

When researching places to stay, look for sustainability designations by the Paris tourist office’s Charter for Sustainable Accommodation in Paris, Green Key, Green Globe, EarthCheck or the European Union Ecolabel.

Hotels in the Paris Convention and Visitor’s Bureau’s Sustainability Program

The Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau is encouraging Paris hotels to take a sustainable approach to operations through its program, “Sustainable Accommodation in Paris.”  Through its workshops, check lists and audits, the bureau encourages environmental, social and societal sustainability.

Since 2012, 463 places providing accommodation have signed on to the program.  The hotels use their best efforts to:

  • Promote sustainable development goals, whether in terms of in-house management or vis-à-vis everyone they have dealings with (transparency, ethics, compliance with laws, respect for human rights, etc.)
  • Reduce water and energy use
  • Reduce and recycle waste
  • Implement an eco-responsible purchasing policy
  • Make suppliers and staff aware of sustainability policies
  • Inform guests of sustainability goals and encourage guests to participate in green effort during their stay
  • Welcome guests with a disability (physical, sensory or mental) to the best possible conditions and offer them appropriate information on accessibility to tourism establishments and activities
  • Improve working conditions for staff, and their well being at work
  • Promote the natural and cultural heritage of the Paris region  (~From Parisinfo.com)

How Can You Tell If A Parisian Hotel Is Green? Look for these Labels:

Green Key

Green Key Sustainability

The Green Key award is the leading standard for excellence in the field of environmental responsibility and sustainable operation within the tourism industry. This prestigious eco-label represents a commitment by businesses that their premises adhere to the strict criteria set by the Foundation for Environmental Education. A Green Key stands for the promise to its guests that by opting to stay with the Green Key establishment, they are helping to make a difference on an environmental level. The high environmental standards expected of these establishments are maintained through rigorous documentation and frequent audits. Green Key is eligible for hotels, hostels, small accommodations, campsites, holiday parks, conference centres, restaurants and attractions.  ~From the Green Key website.

Green Globe

green globe sustainability

Green Globe is the global certification for sustainable tourism. Membership is reserved for companies and organizations who are committed to making positive contributions to people and planet.  Green Globe’s International Standard for Sustainable Tourism was the first standard developed by and for the travel & tourism over 20 years ago. Today Green Globe’s Standard is recognized as the highest level of sustainability certification by leaders in green travel and responsible & eco tourism.

Green Globe Members commit to managing and operating their business and organizations to the highest level of sustainability.  They are committed to benchmarking and managing the use of energy and water with the aim of reducing the use of these resources as well as promoting reuse and recycling of materials.

Green Globe members promote diversity and inclusiveness in their work force, while respecting local cultures and ensuring equitable relations and rewards for all.  The members invest in protecting the culture and heritage of their host destination.

Members commit to act in accordance with local law and respect and promote global compacts promoting equality, health, welfare and human rights and prohibiting child exploitation.  And, these fundamental achievements are managed through a sustainability plan targeting over 300 activities that are carried out at all levels of the company.  ~Find out more at Green Globe.

EarthCheck

earth check sustainability

Member companies are required to develop and document a policy for environmental and social sustainability for the entire organization based on: energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, potable water consumption, water savings, waste sent to landfill, waste recycling, community commitment, community contributions, paper products, cleaning products, pesticide products and corporate social responsibility.  By meeting benchmarks set by the Earthcheck, a hotel or business can be certified as a member.  Find out more at EarthCheck.org.

European Ecolabel

ecolabel sustainability

The European Union Ecolabel is found on products and services – such as accommodations – that  respect the environment. Its criteria guarantee that a given product is fit for use, and that it will have a reduced environmental impact throughout its life cycle.

To qualify for the EU Ecolabel, products have to comply with a stringent set of criteria.  These environmental criteria take the whole product life cycle into account – from the extraction of the raw materials, to production, packaging and transport, right through to your use and then your recycling bin.  This life cycle approach guarantees that the products’ main environmental impacts are reduced in comparison to similar products on the market. ~From EU Ecolabel.

Take a look at this brochure outlining the meaning and showing how to put the EU Ecolabel to work.

Green and Sustainable Paris

Green and Sustainable Paris

Like many big cities, Paris is making a huge push to be “Green and Sustainable.”  Those words are popular in today’s culture, but what do they mean for visitors to Paris?  Following is a brief explanation for those who may be wondering.

What is “Green?”

“Green” has many different meanings to many different people.  The general idea is to reduce human waste and consumption.  It is also defined as being environmentally responsible (another term that means avoid damaging the planet).  And, not to trivialize being green, but maybe it is simply the idea that humans stop working against nature and start working to help nature.

How is that done?  Rather than doing things that hurt the planet or environment, do things that help.  Work to reduce the human race’s effect on nature.  In other words, try not to create a trash heap (read “mountain”) of your used plastic water bottles, plastic straws, aluminum cans, plastic bags, etc….  Try to avoid using cleaners made with toxic substances that run off into the lakes, rivers and oceans.  Try to eat foods grown with the least amount of antibiotics, herbicides and pesticides.  All of these man-made creations go somewhere once they have been used.  And, generally it harms someone or something else down the line.  So, cut down on all of it in an effort to be green.  Most importantly, see how small of a trash heap you can leave behind.

What is “Sustainable?”

“Sustainable” is another word with many different meanings to many different people.  Overall, it is a huge concept with even more far-reaching and global goals.  Those goals include focusing on renewable energy, treating workers and animals ethically and conserving natural resources such as water, land and fuel.  “Green” seems like the manifestation of what individual humans can do to help “sustain” the planet.

Although Paris is the subject of this website, it helps to have some American references for understanding sustainability.  The United States Environmental Protection Agency states that, “Sustainability is based on a simple principle:  Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment. To pursue sustainability is to create and maintain the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony to support present and future generations.”

You may also be surprised to know that the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 committed the United States to sustainability.  (Yes, that long ago.)  The act declares it a national policy “to create and maintain conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations.”

What Does the World Say?

On the world stage, the United Nation’s 1987 “Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development:  Our Common Future” notes that sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the well-being of future generations.  (What were you doing in 1987 to promote the “well-being of future generations?”  Using cans of ozone-depleting hairspray, driving 9-mile-to-the-gallon gas guzzlers and sucking down Big Gulps with long plastic straws?????  I wasn’t using the hairspray, but count me in on gas-guzzlers and 7-Eleven straws.)

Ever broader definitions of sustainability continue to evolve in world politics.  In 2000, the Earth Charter’s definition of sustainability changed to include the idea of a global society, “founded on respect for nature, universal human rights, economic justice, and a culture of peace.”  Yes, that was already 18 years ago.  But, the ideals remain extremely relevant and seem to be more universally accepted.

As a Visitor What Does it Mean, Green and Sustainable Paris?

Paris promotes its commitment to sustainability by providing locals and visitors with green opportunities.  Without knowing it, you may be accidentally participating in green and sustainable initiatives!  But don’t stop at accidentally.  You can actively choose green options while in Paris.

What is Paris Doing to be Green and Sustainable?

The following are a few examples of how Paris is doing its part to be green and sustainable.  At their core, these efforts seek to raise awareness for respecting the environment.  On top of raising awareness, they encourage participation.

Vehicle-Free Days

Car-Free Champs-Élysées Green and Sustainable

Photo “Champs-Élysées sans voitures” by Ulamm licensed under CC 4.0

The first Sunday of each month is vehicle free on the avenue des Champs-Élysées.  That’s right – no cars!  This green and sustainable initiative began in May of 2016 and is an incredible success.  Now locals and visitors can take advantage of a new way to experience the famous avenue – right in the middle of the pavement!

Along with leaving one avenue vehicle free each month, the entire city of Paris is vehicle free for one day each year.  Except for emergencies, taxis, disabled access, open top tour buses and some other necessary vehicles, the whole city is pedestrian friendly for much of the day.  Can you imagine a car-free day in your town?

Urban Oases

Want to visit urban green spaces while visiting?  The Paris City Council has joined in the effort to be green with an app!  Paris Eco Walks is the city council’s downloadable app that leads followers through urban green spaces to see plants and animals.  It is a “go at your own pace” tour that will work for anyone interested in finding green spaces throughout Paris.

Community Gardens

green and sustainable community garden

(Photo from paris.fr)

Along with the many parks in Paris that are vehicle free and easy to enjoy, you may even see community gardens on public land.  These shared gardens, jardins partagés, can be found throughout the city.  Paris’ Green Hand Charter, Charte Main Verte, is an initiative allowing these community gardens.  Citizens work in the gardens and share in the produce.  Not surprisingly, the community gardens are extremely popular.  As well as vegetables and herbs, in some of the gardens you may even see beekeepers tending their hives.  In addition to community gardens, bees are kept throughout Paris.  Even on the roofs of landmarks.  The Opera Garner’s hives produce honey that is on sale in its gift shop – great souvenir!

Farm Life

Paris Farm Icon showing green and sustainable

(Image from La Ferme de Paris Twitter)

Another interesting initiative is the organic Paris Farm.  This fully-functioning farm in the bois de Vincennes is an outstanding testament to the pride Parisians take in promoting green and sustainable agriculture.  Its entire operation is dedicated to respecting the environment using sustainable food production methods.  See French cows, pigs, poultry, sheep, horses and other livestock, plus local crops in their green and sustainable habitat.  (Ferme de Paris, 1 Route du Pesage, 75012, open to the public on Saturdays and Sundays.)

Pesticide-Free Paris

Paris does not use pesticides in its city parks, gardens or cemeteries.  All of those green spaces with blooming flowers and plants are kept without using pesticides.  Additionally, pesticides are prohibited from being used on home terraces and roofs.  Pretty amazing!

Compost-a-Way

Paris even has a compost program for clippings and cuttings from gardens!  It is part of a comprehensive plan for Paris to reduce all forms of trash being generated by the people in in the city – residents and visitors alike.

How Can I Be Green and Sustainable in Paris?

Try to be green and sustainable at the hotel, around town, at restaurants, at markets and in choices to get around the city.  That are a lot of opportunities to be green.  Even if you think making your whole trip green may be too much of a commitment, try making one day a “green day” in Paris!  You’ll have bragging rights for helping Paris work toward sustainability!

At the Hotel and Around Town

  • Use soaps that are free of toxic ingredients
  • Recycle plastic, glass, paper and metal
  • Use the same towel during your stay rather than have the hotel wash it each day
  • Reuse one water bottle during your entire stay in Paris

At Restaurants and Markets

  • Choose locally grown products that are designated organic, free range or natural
  • When eating out or shopping for food, look for Fair Trade products (PFCE – Plate-forme pour le Commerce Equitable) – that means, among other things, the producers have safe working conditions, pay fair wages and are trying to avoid damaging the environment
  • Order appropriately – do not waste food
  • Eat organic foods – look for the “bio” designation on the menu or at markets

Getting Around with Less Environmental Impact

  • Fortunately, Paris is made for walking – a great way to be green
  • If you do not walk, try to take electric or hybrid taxis, ride a bike, or take the Metro
  • Paris is moving toward more efficient buses, so look for eco-friendly signs on buses

By taking even small steps, you can say, “I went to Paris and was GREEN!”  Over 15 million people visit Paris each year.  And, over 2 million people live in Paris.  That many people have a huge impact on the environment in a relatively small space on the earth.  Any steps you take to be green and sustainable while in Paris will help!  Today, the visitor’s motto should be:  Reduce, reuse and recycle.

Do you know if your hotel is committed to sustainability?  Find out how to tell.

green globe reduce, reuse, recycle

Know Your Source.  But Also Ask Questions

Know Your Source.  But Also Ask Questions

Just this past weekend I had an encounter that made me really remember what to do when you receive recommendations from someone – know your source!  And, ask questions!

I ran into a friend at a wine store this past Friday.  It was terrific to see him.  In fact, it was genuinely good to catch up.  We have known each other a long time and he and his wife are extremely worldly.

While I’m asking about his wife and children, he leans over toward the wine racks and grabs a bottle of wine.  He holds it up and shoves it over toward me.  Next he volunteers that it is a great bottle of white wine.  But, better yet, he tells me what a great deal it is for the price.  He pronounced the name with a French accent, making it sound really great.  I was convinced that I had to try it!

Never mind that I really don’t even like white wine.  I listened to a friend, took the advice, bought the wine, got home and opened it up.  After one taste, surprise, surprise, it is not to my liking.

Don’t ASSUME – Know the Source!

What was I thinking?  I knew better!  But, because I know the source and was friends with him, I assumed the wine would be good.  I should have asked some questions, like, “Is it a dry white wine?”  “Would you call it minerally?”  “What about sweet?”

Without asking questions, and without knowing whether the answers appealed to me, I took the advice of a friend.  Wine is a definite personal preference kind of purchase.  Just like what to see in Paris is a personal preference.  Unlike one bottle of inexpensive wine, making choices in Paris is much more consequential.  You may not be back.  And you will have wasted precious time in the most beautiful city on earth.

Friends, guidebooks, and online resources will have suggestions for what to do in Paris.  Of course, some things in Paris are “must sees.”  But beyond those, who cares what someone else likes if you aren’t interested in it?

Don’t assume that if your friend likes it, you will like it.  And, rather than fall for the flashy, descriptive and well-advertised, take a step back and ask yourself, “What do I like?”  “What is going to make me happy?”  “What do I want to see and learn about?”

It Is Your Trip

You are the one spending the money and taking the time off work to see Paris.  Figure out what makes you happy – historic buildings, shopping, monuments, museums of paintings, sculptures, gardens, walking the streets, or maybe it is watching movies in the hotel room.

Then, take a look at, or a listen to, recommendations and suggestions.  Understand and know your source.  Next, ask questions.  Then, really listen to the answers.  After that, determine if the suggestion fits in with what you like to do.  

Everything is available in Paris.  So, don’t fret about lack of choices.  Just make sure it is what you want to do.

Want to know where PariswithScott is coming from?  Take a look here and feel free to ask as many questions as you like.