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A Parisian Style Egg Salad (Oeufs Mayonnaise)

A Parisian Style Egg Salad (Oeufs Mayonnaise)

Parisian Style Egg Salad (Oeufs Mayonnaise)

About this Recipe

By: Scott

Parisian Style Egg Salad (Oeufs Mayonnaise) is a classic Parisian appetizer.  It became difficult to find for quite some time.  But now, oeufs mayonnaise seems to be enjoying a resurgence.  Why not?  They are luscious and surprisingly filling.  Plus, they look interesting on a plate – trying to capture that in the photo.

This is part of the series on making a Parisian dinner right at home.  Again, trying to make easy recipes, with a portion that can be made ahead.  The Parisian Style Egg Salad (Oeufs Mayonnaise), really fits the ticket of ease of preparation, making part ahead and being classically Parisian.

You can prepare the eggs and the mayonnaise a day ahead and simply plate it when you are ready to begin your meal.  The recipe is for 4 servings of 3 halves each.  However, it only takes a little math to increase this for more people.  And, you will be happy to have extra if there are only two of you for dinner.

 

Servings: 4

Prep Time: 1 hour

Meal: Appetizer

Ingredients

  • 6 eggs, nearly hard-boiled and peeled
  • 1 c. mayonnaise – prepared
  • 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tsp. lemon juice
  • 2 tsp. vinegar (white wine vinegar, but could use red wine, white vinegar – probably not balsamic)
  • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
  • pinch of salt
  • optional – chopped chives, chopped green part of green onions, cherry tomatoes halved, sprigs of celery leaves, fresh thyme stem with leaves, any of these for garnish

Step by Step Instructions

Step 1

Boil the eggs (or go buy some already boiled and peeled).  Really, I am a big believer in the 6 minute boiled egg.  They come out beautifully, no dark ring around the yellow, yolky but firm, not dry and mealy.  I use the age-old recipe in many, many cookbooks for a 7 minute boiled egg, but reduce it by a minute.  Place the eggs in a saucepan and cover with plenty of cold water.  Bring to a boil over high heat.  Then, when it comes a boil – a real boil – turn the time on for 6 minutes.  Next, reduce the heat only a little and let them boil for 6 minutes.

Now that is boiling!

Step 2

Remove from heat and pour out the water. Fill the saucepan with the eggs with cold water, a few times, so the cooking stops completely.  Peel and store in the refrigerator if you are making them ahead.

Step 3

Good luck with peeling them.  I have read that if the eggs are old they peel easier.  Or, some say put vinegar in the water.  Others say peel when hot.  Just do your best.  Keep reading and you will find that we are going to hide the blemishes of these little jewels.

Step 4

Make the mayonnaise.  In a bowl, combine remaining ingredients (except garnish) in a bowl and mix until smooth.  It should be thin enough to spoon over the eggs, but not really thin enough to pour.  Set aside.

Step 5

Slice the boiled eggs in half lengthwise.  Place 3 halves, yellow side down, in a peace sign arrangement on a salad plate.  Spoon the mayonnaise over the eggs to cover them completely.  Garnish if desired.  Repeat on 3 other salad plates.

Serve with crusty French bread so none of the mayonnaise is lost.

More Bistro-Style Recipes

Parisian Baked Brabant Potatoes

coming soon

Garlic Chicken

coming soon

A Simple French Bistro-Style Apple Tart Recipe

A Simple French Bistro-Style Apple Tart Recipe

Simple French Bistro-Style Apple Tart Recipe

About this Recipe

By: Scott

Who doesn’t want a French bistro-style apple tart?  And what cook doesn’t want a simple recipe for something good?  This tart recipe is simple and made with super basic ingredients.  It will cook into an impressive dessert that will win you fans from all over.  Although I had to make it multiple times to make it photo worthy, each one tasted terrific.  Don’t worry if it isn’t the most beautiful thing you ever made.  Slice it up and serve it up.  If you want even more on your dessert plate, you can add ice cream or whipped cream on the side or on top.  But, it really doesn’t need it.

Servings: 4-6

Prep Time: 1 hour

Calories: 353

Meal: Dessert

Ingredients

  • 3 Granny Smith apples
  • 3/4 c. plus 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp. lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 sheet puff pastry
  • parchment paper

Step by Step Instructions

Step 1

Peel, core and slice the apples into 1/8” – 1/4” slices.  (I do it by hand and wind up with odd sizes and pieces.  But, it kind of makes the end result have softness and crunch in each bite.  If you really want to have even slices, try using a French mandoline or the much less expensive, benriner mandoline.  Be careful, you can slice your finger off.)

Step 2

Put the apples in a bowl and sprinkle with the sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice.  Then, toss with a fork – or your hands – trying to coat each slice with some of the sugar mixture.  Pour the apple mixture into a colander and place the colander back into the bowl.  Set aside for about 30 minutes so that delicious juice will drain from apples.

Step 3

When the apples have finished making their juice, place a sheet of parchment paper on a baking sheet and place the puff pastry onto the parchment.  (Do not use a baking sheet that has an air layer sandwiched between metal.  The bottom will not get done enough.)

Step 4

Turn the apple mixture onto the dough, make a decorative pattern with the apples, or not.  Then, fold the dough up around the edges and over some of the apples.  Pinch together the edges of puff pastry where the dough laps over itself.  Next, brush the dough with the egg and sprinkle the remaining 2 Tbsp. of sugar over the dough brushed with egg.

Step 5

In a small saucepan combine the liquid that drained off the apples and the butter.  Place over medium-high heat, bring to a boil and reduce the liquid until it is thick.  The liquid will become thick and caramel colored.  Remove from heat and drizzle the liquid over the apples.  Then, bake in the preheated oven for about an hour, or until the dough is nicely browned and the apples are cooked.  Remove from oven and let sit at least 5-10 minutes before cutting.  Serve hot or room temperature.

More Bistro-Style Recipes

Oeufs Mayonnaise

Parisian Baked Brabant Potatoes

coming soon

Garlic Chicken

coming soon

Recipes for a Parisian Bistro-Style Meal

Recipes for a Parisian Bistro-Style Meal

Cooking and enjoying a Parisian bistro-style meal is a great way to get in the spirit of visiting Paris.  With a little planning, it can be an easy weeknight event.  Or, invite some friends and make it a weekend dinner for family and friends.  Either way, it will transport you to Paris – even if just for the evening.

These Parisian recipes are pretty simple with ingredients that can be purchased in nearly any local grocery store.  Do not worry if it doesn’t come out perfect.  My cooking always seems to look lopsided on the plate.  It took me multiple attempts and lots of photos to try to make these dishes look as good as I could.

Three Part Series for Parisian Bistro-Style Meal

There are 3 parts in this series on Parisian recipes.  I always start with dessert.  Then, you will find the appetizer.  Finally, the main course and a couple of sides.

With those 3 courses, it will be a simple, but filling Parisian bistro-style meal.  It should satisfy your yen for French food – right in your own home.

Here is the first in the series.

 

Should you want to know what the French have for a full dinner, the following are the courses and the order.

 

Aperitif (same in English)

Generally a glass of Champagne or a glass of dry white wine, maybe a kir, along with some roasted nuts, assorted olives and a cracker.  Not a cocktail hour, but a settle-in drink while waiting for everyone invited to gather round (or make it to the dinner).

 

Entrée (our appetizer)

This is the first course at the table.  Generally, this will compliment the main course.  So, if you are having fish or seafood for the main course, you may want to have a vegetable tart or onion soup.  If you are having meat for the main course, then choose a fish or seafood appetizer.

 

Plat Principal (main dish)

Obviously, this is the bigger portion of the meal that will include a protein and a side dish or two.  Again, make it work with the appetizer to provide variety during the meal.

 

Salade (salad)

Just like how it sounds, but probably very simple.  Some greens, a light dressing and really that is it.  No need to go crazy with eggs, olives, nuts, dried fruits and all the things we toss together in a salad.

 

Fromage (cheese)

A great thing about Paris is that there are cheese shops all over the place and it is easy to have little tastes of a variety of cheese at the end of a meal.  Like you can imagine, a plate may be presented family style with 3 cheeses.  Maybe some honey, preserved fruits or roasted nuts will be on the side.  Then, you slice off a portion for your plate and pass it around.

 

Dessert (dessert)

Been waiting the whole meal for this?  Well, like over here, some people go all out on extravagant desserts and others are simple and often contain fruit.  The thing about Paris is, pastry stores create beautiful desserts that are wonderful tasting – and you don’t have to make them.  So why not go all out on dessert in Paris?

 

Café (coffee)

At the end, after dessert, coffee will be served.  Often times a small bit of chocolate will be served to accompany the coffee.

By this time, you should be D-O-N-E.  Even without huge portions, this should be a sufficiency.

The recipes here are for an abbreviated version of this full French meal.  Even without all of the courses (let alone all the dishes to wash), this Parisian bistro-style meal will probably satisfy you.

 

 

Useful Terms – Spoken Like a Native

Useful Terms – Spoken Like a Native

Useful terms are something everyone visiting a foreign country needs.  If for nothing else, to find the bathroom.  But, knowing a few other words for food and drinks will at least take care of basic needs.  I just finished a page on useful terms and want to share the story of how it came about.

New Site

If you don’t know it by now, this is a new website/blog/creation.  After finally going live a few weeks ago, pages still need to be finalized – all while writing new blog entries and triple checking what is up and how it looks.  Lots and lots of writing, revising, tweaking appearance of the pages, increasing page load speeds, making sure keywords are used, etc…  So many words are used that I have never heard of describing things I never thought of.

Food and Drink is a “main menu item.”  That means it has several “pages” under it.  (I am probably getting all of this wrong.)  And, while working on the pages under the Food and Drink main menu, it seemed like providing some useful terms would be a good idea.  After all, this site, pariswithscott.com, is to try to help first time visitors or people who want to visit Paris on their own be able to do it.

Basic Useful Terms for Food

So, I made a list of super basic terms.  Not many, real basic food terms.  Just so looking at a menu posted outside of a restaurant may not be completely out of the question.  While doing that, I started to sound out the French words and write in my own pronunciation guide!!  As if I know how to tell someone how to say something in French!!!

Words like temperatures for cooking a steak for “steak frites.”  Medium-rare is “à point” (ah-pwahw), medium is “cuit” (kwee), well done is “bien cuit” (bee-iahn-kwee).  (I don’t think the French really know how to cook something “bien cuit.”)  And on and on for me sounding out the pronunciation.

Wouldn’t It Be Great…

While writing down those pronunciations I emailed Susan, the talented woman who is working with me on the site. “Wouldn’t it be great if we could add in some way for visitors to the site to hear the word pronounced by a native French speaker?”

Well, she did it.  Susan made the page absolutely incredible!!!  Take a look and a listen here:

https://www.pariswithscott.com/food-and-drink-in-paris/french-pronunciation-guide-with-audio/

The internet is incredible.  Useful terms are great, but hearing them, while seeing the word, is really great.  Okay, that is it.  This entry is a thank you to Susan!

Subscribe If You Want

If you want to sign up for the newsletter, feel free.  I’m trying to write entries and every now and then they will be emailed out to you if you subscribe.  And, always happy to hear suggestions on making it better.  Just went live not too long ago and still getting things worked out.  This is kind of a preview for you.

Thanks for taking a look.

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