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Green and Sustainable Paris

Green and Sustainable Paris

Like many big cities, Paris is making a huge push to be “Green and Sustainable.”  Those words are popular in today’s culture, but what do they mean for visitors to Paris?  Following is a brief explanation for those who may be wondering.

What is “Green?”

“Green” has many different meanings to many different people.  The general idea is to reduce human waste and consumption.  It is also defined as being environmentally responsible (another term that means avoid damaging the planet).  And, not to trivialize being green, but maybe it is simply the idea that humans stop working against nature and start working to help nature.

How is that done?  Rather than doing things that hurt the planet or environment, do things that help.  Work to reduce the human race’s effect on nature.  In other words, try not to create a trash heap (read “mountain”) of your used plastic water bottles, plastic straws, aluminum cans, plastic bags, etc….  Try to avoid using cleaners made with toxic substances that run off into the lakes, rivers and oceans.  Try to eat foods grown with the least amount of antibiotics, herbicides and pesticides.  All of these man-made creations go somewhere once they have been used.  And, generally it harms someone or something else down the line.  So, cut down on all of it in an effort to be green.  Most importantly, see how small of a trash heap you can leave behind.

What is “Sustainable?”

“Sustainable” is another word with many different meanings to many different people.  Overall, it is a huge concept with even more far-reaching and global goals.  Those goals include focusing on renewable energy, treating workers and animals ethically and conserving natural resources such as water, land and fuel.  “Green” seems like the manifestation of what individual humans can do to help “sustain” the planet.

Although Paris is the subject of this website, it helps to have some American references for understanding sustainability.  The United States Environmental Protection Agency states that, “Sustainability is based on a simple principle:  Everything that we need for our survival and well-being depends, either directly or indirectly, on our natural environment. To pursue sustainability is to create and maintain the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony to support present and future generations.”

You may also be surprised to know that the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 committed the United States to sustainability.  (Yes, that long ago.)  The act declares it a national policy “to create and maintain conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the social, economic and other requirements of present and future generations.”

What Does the World Say?

On the world stage, the United Nation’s 1987 “Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development:  Our Common Future” notes that sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the well-being of future generations.  (What were you doing in 1987 to promote the “well-being of future generations?”  Using cans of ozone-depleting hairspray, driving 9-mile-to-the-gallon gas guzzlers and sucking down Big Gulps with long plastic straws?????  I wasn’t using the hairspray, but count me in on gas-guzzlers and 7-Eleven straws.)

Ever broader definitions of sustainability continue to evolve in world politics.  In 2000, the Earth Charter’s definition of sustainability changed to include the idea of a global society, “founded on respect for nature, universal human rights, economic justice, and a culture of peace.”  Yes, that was already 18 years ago.  But, the ideals remain extremely relevant and seem to be more universally accepted.

As a Visitor What Does it Mean, Green and Sustainable Paris?

Paris promotes its commitment to sustainability by providing locals and visitors with green opportunities.  Without knowing it, you may be accidentally participating in green and sustainable initiatives!  But don’t stop at accidentally.  You can actively choose green options while in Paris.

What is Paris Doing to be Green and Sustainable?

The following are a few examples of how Paris is doing its part to be green and sustainable.  At their core, these efforts seek to raise awareness for respecting the environment.  On top of raising awareness, they encourage participation.

Vehicle-Free Days

Car-Free Champs-Élysées Green and Sustainable

Photo “Champs-Élysées sans voitures” by Ulamm licensed under CC 4.0

The first Sunday of each month is vehicle free on the avenue des Champs-Élysées.  That’s right – no cars!  This green and sustainable initiative began in May of 2016 and is an incredible success.  Now locals and visitors can take advantage of a new way to experience the famous avenue – right in the middle of the pavement!

Along with leaving one avenue vehicle free each month, the entire city of Paris is vehicle free for one day each year.  Except for emergencies, taxis, disabled access, open top tour buses and some other necessary vehicles, the whole city is pedestrian friendly for much of the day.  Can you imagine a car-free day in your town?

Urban Oases

Want to visit urban green spaces while visiting?  The Paris City Council has joined in the effort to be green with an app!  Paris Eco Walks is the city council’s downloadable app that leads followers through urban green spaces to see plants and animals.  It is a “go at your own pace” tour that will work for anyone interested in finding green spaces throughout Paris.

Community Gardens

green and sustainable community garden

(Photo from paris.fr)

Along with the many parks in Paris that are vehicle free and easy to enjoy, you may even see community gardens on public land.  These shared gardens, jardins partagés, can be found throughout the city.  Paris’ Green Hand Charter, Charte Main Verte, is an initiative allowing these community gardens.  Citizens work in the gardens and share in the produce.  Not surprisingly, the community gardens are extremely popular.  As well as vegetables and herbs, in some of the gardens you may even see beekeepers tending their hives.  In addition to community gardens, bees are kept throughout Paris.  Even on the roofs of landmarks.  The Opera Garner’s hives produce honey that is on sale in its gift shop – great souvenir!

Farm Life

Paris Farm Icon

(image from La Ferme de Paris twitter)

Another interesting initiative is the organic Paris Farm.  This fully-functioning farm in the bois de Vincennes is an outstanding testament to the pride Parisians take in promoting green and sustainable agriculture.  Its entire operation is dedicated to respecting the environment using sustainable food production methods.  See French cows, pigs, poultry, sheep, horses and other livestock, plus local crops in their green and sustainable habitat.  (Ferme de Paris, 1 Route du Pesage, 75012, open to the public on Saturdays and Sundays.)

Pesticide-Free Paris

Paris does not use pesticides in its city parks, gardens or cemeteries.  All of those green spaces with blooming flowers and plants are kept without using pesticides.  Additionally, pesticides are prohibited from being used on home terraces and roofs.  Pretty amazing!

Compost-a-Way

Paris even has a compost program for clippings and cuttings from gardens!  It is part of a comprehensive plan for Paris to reduce all forms of trash being generated by the people in in the city – residents and visitors alike.

How Can I Be Green and Sustainable in Paris?

Try to be green and sustainable at the hotel, around town, at restaurants, at markets and in choices to get around the city.  That are a lot of opportunities to be green.  Even if you think making your whole trip green may be too much of a commitment, try making one day a “green day” in Paris!  You’ll have bragging rights for helping Paris work toward sustainability!

At the Hotel and Around Town

  • Use soaps that are free of toxic ingredients
  • Recycle plastic, glass, paper and metal
  • Use the same towel during your stay rather than have the hotel wash it each day
  • Reuse one water bottle during your entire stay in Paris

At Restaurants and Markets

  • Choose locally grown products that are designated organic, free range or natural
  • When eating out or shopping for food, look for Fair Trade products (PFCE – Plate-forme pour le Commerce Equitable) – that means, among other things, the producers have safe working conditions, pay fair wages and are trying to avoid damaging the environment
  • Order appropriately – do not waste food
  • Eat organic foods – look for the “bio” designation on the menu or at markets

Getting Around with Less Environmental Impact

  • Fortunately, Paris is made for walking – a great way to be green
  • If you do not walk, try to take electric or hybrid taxis, ride a bike, or take the Metro
  • Paris is moving toward more efficient buses, so look for eco-friendly signs on buses

By taking even small steps, you can say, “I went to Paris and was GREEN!”  Over 15 million people visit Paris each year.  And, over 2 million people live in Paris.  That many people have a huge impact on the environment in a relatively small space on the earth.  Any steps you take to be green and sustainable while in Paris will help!  Today, the visitor’s motto should be:  Reduce, reuse and recycle.

Do you know if your hotel is committed to sustainability?  Find out how to tell.

green globe reduce, reuse, recycle

Know Your Source.  But Also Ask Questions

Know Your Source.  But Also Ask Questions

Just this past weekend I had an encounter that made me really remember what to do when you receive recommendations from someone – know your source!  And, ask questions!

I ran into a friend at a wine store this past Friday.  It was terrific to see him.  In fact, it was genuinely good to catch up.  We have known each other a long time and he and his wife are extremely worldly.

While I’m asking about his wife and children, he leans over toward the wine racks and grabs a bottle of wine.  He holds it up and shoves it over toward me.  Next he volunteers that it is a great bottle of white wine.  But, better yet, he tells me what a great deal it is for the price.  He pronounced the name with a French accent, making it sound really great.  I was convinced that I had to try it!

Never mind that I really don’t even like white wine.  I listened to a friend, took the advice, bought the wine, got home and opened it up.  After one taste, surprise, surprise, it is not to my liking.

Don’t ASSUME – Know the Source!

What was I thinking?  I knew better!  But, because I know the source and was friends with him, I assumed the wine would be good.  I should have asked some questions, like, “Is it a dry white wine?”  “Would you call it minerally?”  “What about sweet?”

Without asking questions, and without knowing whether the answers appealed to me, I took the advice of a friend.  Wine is a definite personal preference kind of purchase.  Just like what to see in Paris is a personal preference.  Unlike one bottle of inexpensive wine, making choices in Paris is much more consequential.  You may not be back.  And you will have wasted precious time in the most beautiful city on earth.

Friends, guidebooks, and online resources will have suggestions for what to do in Paris.  Of course, some things in Paris are “must sees.”  But beyond those, who cares what someone else likes if you aren’t interested in it?

Don’t assume that if your friend likes it, you will like it.  And, rather than fall for the flashy, descriptive and well-advertised, take a step back and ask yourself, “What do I like?”  “What is going to make me happy?”  “What do I want to see and learn about?”

It Is Your Trip

You are the one spending the money and taking the time off work to see Paris.  Figure out what makes you happy – historic buildings, shopping, monuments, museums of paintings, sculptures, gardens, walking the streets, or maybe it is watching movies in the hotel room.

Then, take a look at, or a listen to, recommendations and suggestions.  Understand and know your source.  Next, ask questions.  Then, really listen to the answers.  After that, determine if the suggestion fits in with what you like to do.  

Everything is available in Paris.  So, don’t fret about lack of choices.  Just make sure it is what you want to do.

Want to know where PariswithScott is coming from?  Take a look here and feel free to ask as many questions as you like.

Bastille Day Weekend 2018

Bastille Day Weekend 2018

Bastille Day and the World Cup final collide on the weekend of July 14, 2018!  On Saturday, France will celebrate Bastille Day.  Then on Sunday, France battles Croatia for the World Cup.

What is Bastille Day?

For those of us celebrating Bastille Day, and for those who want to know more about it, here is a short description.  Bastille Day, in French “la Fête Nationale ” or “le 14 juillet,” is an annual national public holiday.  It celebrates the storming of the Bastille prison on July 14, 1789.  Because there were only a few prisoners there at the time, the storming was mostly symbolic.  However, this was the start of the overthrow of Louis XVI’s regime and the beginning of the Republic of France.  That means it is a big event for all the non-royalists in France.

During the years of the revolution, the prison was completely torn apart and never rebuilt.  The site of the Bastille prison is now the Place de la Bastille.  At its center is the July Column (“Colonne de Juillet”).  Rather than commemorating the storming of the Bastille, this column recognizes those who fought in the revolution of July, 1830.

July Column in Place de la Bastille

A little confusing, but taken together, the square and the column honor and remember commoners who fought for freedom from oppression.  Atop the July Column is Auguste Dumont’s gilded statue, “Génie de la Liberté,” or Spirit of Freedom.  Appropriate, don’t you think?  Another place to see and feel some of the intensity of the emotions of the people is in the Louvre.  Take a look at Delacroix’s moving painting, “Liberty Leading the People.”  Delacroix used the July Revolution for his inspiration.

Bastille Day Celebrations

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe with Tricolore

Along with the landmarks commemorating the revolutions, Bastille Day is a celebration of freedom.  It is much like our Independence Day.  In Paris, a gigantic French flag, or “tricolore,” is flown within the grand arch of the Arc de Triomphe.  The French military parades down the avenue des Champs- Élysées.  Mounted cavalry, foot soldiers, regimental bands and officers in vehicles follow each other in one of the oldest annual military parades.  French air force planes will fly overhead.  And, people will generally make merry and enjoy the show put on for them.

Celebrate Freedom

Like our own July 4 celebrations, Bastille Day in France features fireworks lighting up the night sky, neighborhoods having street parties and families and friends gathering for traditional French meals.  On the Champs-de-Mars, a concert will entertain thousands.  And across the whole country, the Marseillaise, or the French National Anthem, will play over the radio waves and bands will perform it repeatedly.

As a visitor, the festivities can be a lot of fun.  But do not expect many shops, museums or restaurants to be open.  This includes the Eiffel Tower which was built as a landmark celebrating the 100th anniversary of the storming of the Bastille.  It will be closed in preparation of a grand fireworks display.

Around the World

Many places around the globe celebrate French heritage on Bastille Day.  Among other more significant events, restaurants have special dinners and wine-pairings, people fly French flags, and, in New Orleans, waiters participate in races in the French Quarter.  All in good fun celebrating Bastille Day!

World Cup

For the World Cup, we hope there will be even more celebration in the French capital!

What does your community do to celebrate Bastille Day?

13 Awe-Inspiring Churches

13 Awe-Inspiring Churches

Paris is chock-a-block with awe-inspiring churches.  Many of the grandest are newer replacements built on ancient Christian sites.  But “newer” is a relative term.  Like many other buildings in Paris, some of these churches are many hundreds of years old with long and interesting histories.

France is overwhelmingly Roman Catholic – whether in name only, or more.  The churches listed here began, and most remain, Roman Catholic.  Only those that have been deconsecrated are no longer under the Pope of Rome.

The awe-inspiring churches listed here are in no particular order.  Of course you know some, but others are definitely worth the effort to visit.  Also, the names of the churches are listed in French.  English may seem easier for now, but in Paris, only French will be written on signs, maps and plans of the quarter at Métro exits.

If you plan on visiting the awe-inspiring churches that are still maintained as active Roman Catholic institutions, please be respectful of the religion.  Some churches have been known to deny entry to those without long pants or covered shoulders.

So, here they are, 13 awe-inspiring churches in Paris:

1. Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris

notre-dame de paris from behind on the river

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris is the most well known of the awe-inspiring churches in Paris.  It is amazing to behold and it is an incredibly beautiful feat of engineering.  The plaza out in front provides plenty of space to admire this marvelous creation.

Inside is a working Medieval masterpiece.  Mass is said regularly.  Step inside for a view to the Middle Ages.  Smell the incense, hear the homily (over loudspeakers now) and enjoy the soft light coming in through the stained glass.

Make sure to walk around the entire cathedral.  The shady side close to the river is a sweet little park.  On the opposite side, stand close to the sides and look up to see the gargoyles overhead.  Beware the gargoyles during a rain storm.  They deliver the water out and away from the church – onto the sidewalk.  Also, take a look in the back.  Inside the fence surrounding the church, little storage areas protect stone pieces and parts from the cathedral.

Architectural Style:

  • Notre-Dame de Paris is the perfection of French Gothic architecture.  Some may declare cathedrals in other cities to be the best example, but … seemingly everything is perfection.  From the arches above the doors, the towers, and the ornate flying buttresses.  And that is not even considering the spectacular interior.

Interesting Facts:

  • During the Revolution, Notre-Dame de Paris was used as a warehouse.
  • Notre-Dame de Paris celebrated 850 years in 2013.  It has witnessed 80 kings, two emperors and five republics.

Getting There:

Address:  6 Parvis Notre-Dame, on the Place Jean-Paul II, 75004
Nearest Métro and RER:  Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame
Official website:  http://www.notredamedeparis.fr/en/
Admission fee:  No, but, there is a charge to enter the treasury, the crypt and to climb the towers.

2.  Sacré-Cœur

sacra-coeur from a distance

From a distance, Sacré-Cœur could compete for the best of the awe-inspiring churches.  Its gleaming white stone sitting atop the city like a jewel makes it one of the most recognizable places in Paris.

The complete name is Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre (Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Montmartre), but generally the name is shortened to only, “Sacré-Cœur.”

Besides the church itself, one of the strongest draws to visit Sacré-Cœur is the view from the steps overlooking Paris.  Beautiful at day or night, morning or evening, blazing hot or rainy.  The expansive vistas are adored by many Parisians and visitors.

Architectural Style:

  • Sacré-Cœur’s architectural style is Romano-Byzantine.  It was consecrated in 1919.  And, at nearly 100, this is the youngest of the awe-inspiring churches.

Interesting Fact:

  • The ceiling above the alter is covered by one of the largest mosaics in the world. Beautiful blue and gold tiles create a lovely canopy drawing you all the way into the basilica to see the powerful mosaic.

Getting There:

Address: 35, rue du Chevalier de la Barre, 75018
Nearest Métro: Anvers or Abbesses, then walk to the funiculaire. If you are looking up to Sacré-Cœur, the funiculaire is to the left at the bottom of the hill. Taking the funiculaire will take one regular Metro ticket.
Official website: http://www.sacre-coeur-montmartre.com/english/
Admission fee:  No, but there is a charge for visiting the crypt and climbing the dome.

3.  Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés

saint-germain-des-près tower

“Prés” is the French word for grassy areas or fields.  So the translation of the name from French is, “Church of St. Germain of the Fields.”  Of course, it doesn’t look like it now, but when Paris was beginning as a village, this area was only fields.

In the early Middle Ages, the Merovingian King, Childebert I commanded the creation of an abbey (which includes a church) in these fields.  And in 558, St. Germain, the bishop of Paris, consecrated the first church on this site.

As time moved on, a large, wealthy and important royal abbey grew on the fields.  So large that it encompassed much of the area that is now referred to as the St. Germain neighborhood.  And, so important that royalty was buried here until Dagobert I was buried at Basilique Cathédrale de Saint-Denis in 639.

That original church is long gone, but the existing building it is the oldest of the big churches in Paris with parts dating from the 1000s and before.

Architectural Style:

  • The architectural style of Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés is described on its website as “primitive Gothic.”  However, after many years and reconstructions, elements and details of other styles can be found.
  • Inside, the painted interior from the 1800s may be a little surprising.  The walls and columns are covered with interesting designs and beautiful scenes painted in many colors.  Up above, the ceiling is dotted with thousands of gold stars on a deep blue background.  Around back you can see the flying buttresses.  Compared to the ornate flying buttresses on the Gothic churches that would be built in the future, these may seem rather utilitarian.

Interesting Fact:

  • In 1650, the philosopher, mathematician and scientist René Descartes died.  After his body was moved a few times, finally in 1819 his cremated remains were interred in Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés.  But, his head is preserved in the Musée de l’Homme.

Getting There:

Address:  3 Place Saint-Germain-des-Prés, 75006
Nearest Métro:  Saint-Germain-des-Prés
Official websitehttps://www.eglise-saintgermaindespres.fr
Admission fee:  No

4.  Chapelle Royale, Château de Versailles

Chapelle Royale Versailles

Pretty much everything that Louis XIV commissioned is over-the-top.  And, his chapel at Versailles is no exception.  From the multi-colored marble floor to the exuberant ceiling paintings, everything is magnificent.

It is the fifth royal chapel at Versailles.  And, this last one, is one of the awe-inspiring churches in Paris (or, very close to Paris).

According to its official website, “Every day the Court attended the King’s mass, which were usually held in the morning at 10. The sovereign sat in the royal tribune surrounded by his family. The ladies of the Court occupied the lateral tribunes, while the Officers and members of the public were seated in the nave.”

Architectural Style:

  • The Chapelle Royale (or Royal Chapel) is considered a masterpiece of the architect, Jules Hardouin-Mansart.  He designed it in the French Baroque architectural style and it was completed in 1710, two years after his death.

Interesting Fact:

  • Intertwined script Ls adorn the chapel.  These represent Saint Louis and Louis XIV.  Louis XIV commanded the chapel to be built. The chapel is dedicated to Saint Louis.

Getting There:

Address:  Château de Versailles
RER:  Gare de Versailles Chantiers
Official websitehttp://en.chateauversailles.fr/discover/estate/palace/royal-chapel#guided-tour
Admission fee:  Yes, plus a tour is required to go inside the chapel.
No longer a consecrated church

5.  Église Saint-Gervais-et-Saint-Protais

Saint-Gervais-Saint-Protais facade

One of the best things about this awe-inspiring church is that you can enjoy it with practically no one else in sight.  Even though it is right in the middle of the busy 4th Arrondissement, it does not seem to be visited by many tourists.  Take advantage of the solitude to really enjoy its beauty.

Of course, like many other awe-inspiring churches, the grand organ is mesmerizing when played.  It is also one of the oldest in Paris.  Concerts are not common events, so attending mass may be the best time to experience the organ.

Architectural Style:

  • Église Saint-Gervais-et-Saint-Protais is the first church with a French Baroque facade.  Most of the interior is Late Gothic with fine examples of Gothic stained glass and some from modern times as well.

Interesting Fact:

  • Don’t miss the choir stalls and the incredible wood carvings from the time of Francois I and Henri II (1500s and 1600s).  Although beautifully carved, some of the reliefs can be quite disturbing.
  • During the Revolution, it was the Temple of Reason and Youth.

Getting There:

Address:  13 rue des Barres, 75004 or Place Saint-Gervais
Nearest Métro:  Hôtel de Ville or Pont Marie  (the church is behind the Hotel de Ville)
Official websitehttps://www.paris.catholique.fr/-eglise-saint-gervais-saint-protais-.html
Admission fee:  No

6.  Basilique Cathédrale de Saint-Denis

Saint-Denis crypt Marie-Antoinette's tomb

Marie-Antoinette’s tomb is in the Bourbon crypt.

Around the year 250, St. Denis was beheaded on Montmartre (the hill of martyrs).  St. Denis did not die there.  He picked up his head and walked North and eventually collapsed on the spot where the current cathedral is located.  The way to find St. Denis in any line up of saints is to look for the one carrying his head, that is St. Denis.

Since St. Denis’ death, some type of shrine or memorial for the dead has been occupying the site.  Because of its long history as a burial ground, many archeological excavations have taken place over the years.  Around the church, many sarcophagi have been excavated with some dating from as early as the 300s and 400s.

Inside the cathedral, tombs are arranged throughout the main chapel.  A map illustrates who is where.  Along with containing the remains of the French royalty, the collection of funerary sculpture from the 12th to the 16th centuries is the largest of its kind.  Life-like effigies adorn the tombs.  On some, symbolic animal sculptures sit at their feet.

saint denis funerary statue of dog

Architectural Style:

  • This church is held out as the first truly Gothic cathedral.  In 1144, the apse was consecrated with King Louis VII and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine leading the procession.

Interesting Fact:

  • Along with Louis XIV, the remains of Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette are in the crypt.

Getting There:

Address:  1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur, 93200 Saint-Denis
Nearest Métro:  Basilique de Saint-Denis
Official websitehttp://www.saint-denis-basilique.fr/en/
Admission fee:  Yes

7.  Sainte-Chapelle

Sainte-Chapelle exterior and Palais du Justice

Louis IX (later Saint Louis) commanded the construction of this chapel to house holy Christian relics, including Christ’s crown of thorns.  In 1248, Sainte-Chapelle was consecrated as a Roman Catholic church.  Eventually, in 1842, the French government designated it a National Monument.

Sainte-Chapelle is truly one of the most awe-inspiring churches in Paris.  The upper chapel is mind blowing.  Walls of stained glass soar toward the ceiling.  Every inch of surface is painted.  It is kind of like being inside a jewel box.  This magnificent chapel was reserved for worship exclusively by the king and his family.  (The photo at the beginning is of the stained glass in Sainte-Chapelle.  Fit for a king, no?)

Staff and others would worship in the lower chapel.  It is fascinating to visit and also extremely beautiful.  Also, the oldest fresco in France is within the lower chapel.

Looking at the Île de la Cité, there is a spire that seems to stick up out of nowhere.  It seems to be kind of near Notre-Dame de Paris, but then if you are walking, it kind of disappears.  It reappears while looking into the courtyard of the Palais de Justice – and – looking up. That spire belongs to Sainte-Chapelle.  The front of Sainte-Chapelle is hidden behind the walls of the Palais de Justice, fronting the street.  If there is no line, you can walk right by and miss it.

Architectural Style:

  • Sainte-Chapelle is definitely in the Gothic style.  More particularly, it is in the Rayonnant Gothic style.  Rayonnant comes from the French word for radiating, as in the famous rose windows.

Interesting Fact:

  • Sainte-Chapelle was built in ONLY 7 YEARS!!!   Incredible.

Getting There:

Address:  8, boulevard du Palais, 75001
Nearest Métro and RER:  Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame
Official websitehttp://www.sainte-chapelle.fr/en/
Admission fee:  Yes

8.  Le Panthéon

Panthéon

Le Panthéon is one of the most awe-inspiring churches that is no longer a church, but a temple to many of the worthies of France.

In 1744, Louis XV was suffering an illness so horrible, that he vowed, should he recover, he would direct a church be built to Ste. Geneviève.  After he recovered, he kept his word and the church of Ste. Genevieve was built.

However, once the structure was completed in 1791, the French revolutionaries changed the use of the building to a mausoleum for French dignitaries.  A pantheon, or temple to all gods.  During its history, it served as a Christian temple again.  But, when Victor Hugo died in 1885, Le Panthéon was once and for all converted to a temple honoring French men and women who provided France with great service.

The crypt is a fascinating trip through history.  Tombs and crypts fill the lower floor.  Look for the names of Voltaire, Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Émile Zola, Marie Curie, and Alexandre Dumas.

Architectural Style:

  • According to its publications, Le Panthéon is a mix of Classical and Gothic styles.  Its design by the architect Soufflot was based on St. Paul’s in London and St. Peter’s in Rome and includes a tremendous dome.  That dome is easy to see from many parts of Paris.

Interesting Facts:

  • In 2018, Simone Veil was the most recent addition to Le Panthéon.  Veil was a holocaust survivor and politician who broke barriers for women in French politics.
  • Climb to the top for beautiful views.  Also, Foucault’s pendulum is suspended from the ceiling.

Getting There:

Address:  Place du Panthéon, 75005
Nearest Métro:  Maubert-Mutualité or Cardinal Lemoine (both are several blocks away)
RER:  Luxembourg
Official websitehttp://www.paris-pantheon.fr/en
Admission fee:  Yes
No longer a consecrated church

9.  Église Saint-Séverin

Detail of Saint-Severin

Detail of Saint-Séverin. Look at the fine stonework and extraordinary gargoyles.

Séverin was a hermit living by the Seine in the 5th and 6th centuries.  In 504, he cured King Clovis of a disease for which his doctors had no remedy.  Along with that good deed for the royalty, he also performed other healing miracles that brought him enough admiration to dedicate a church to him.

Since the 500s, there has been a St. Severin church on that spot.  That’s right, 1,500+ years ago.  Parts of the building date back to the end of the 11th century, making it one of the oldest churches in Paris.  Most of the current structure is from the 1200s – 1400s.  Like other awe-inspiring churches, it has an organ.  Much of the works are from the 18th century with even earlier pipes.

If you are in near Place Saint-Michel trying to find some street food, walk down Rue Saint-Séverin to find this church.  Take a look at the gargoyles on the exterior, the flying buttresses and go in to see the interior.  Some of the stained glass windows are from as long ago as the 14th century!  Not as tall, or as big, or as grand as Notre-Dame de Paris, but it is still impressive.

Architectural Style:

  • Late Gothic.  It is in middle of a busy neighborhood, so maybe it doesn’t get as much attention as it should?

Interesting Fact:

  • The oldest bell in Paris rings from its tower.

Getting There:

Address:  3, rue des Prêtres Saint-Séverin, 75005
Nearest Métro:  Saint-Michel – Notre-Dame
Official websitehttps://saint-severin.com
Admission fee:  No

10.  Église de la Madeleine

Église de la Madeleine ends the straightaway leading from the Place de la Concorde between the massive buildings flanking its north side.  It is always startling to merrily trip around the obelisk, look to the side and then see a temple at the end of the street.

Nearly continuously from the 13th century, a Roman Catholic parish has been in charge of the site.  And like so many of the sites for other awe-inspiring churches, various buildings have been built and torn down through the centuries.  The current structure, however, is definitely unique among them.

Église de la Madeleine has an amazing organ and concerts are held regularly.  Check the website when planning your trip for upcoming concert dates.

Down around back are stalls filled with beautiful flowers.  And, across the street in the back you can find Fauchon – an incredible purveyor of delicacies.  Then across from Église de la Madeleine in other directions, you will find Ralph Lauren, Bulgari, and other posh shops.

Architectural Style:

  • It looks like a Roman or Greek temple, and in fact, its architectural style is not surprisingly, Neo-Classical.  The symmetrical columns, huge pediment and expansive stairs may make you feel as though you are in an ancient land.

Interesting Fact:

  • The current building is the result of Napoleon I’s desire for a Temple to the Glory of the Great Army.  So, it really was built as a temple.  But, as history would have it, Napoleon I was exiled before it could be used as a secular temple.  The monarchy was restored (the Restoration), and that is when King Louis XVIII declared the building would be a Roman Catholic church.  And, since its consecration in 1842, a Roman Catholic church it remains.

Getting There:

Address:  Place de la Madeleine, 75008
Nearest Métro:  Madeleine
Official websitehttp://www.eglise-lamadeleine.com
Admission fee:  No

11.  Église Saint-Eustache

Saint-Eustache interior

Église Saint-Eustache began as a small chapel in 1213.  The first stone of the current awe-inspiring church was laid on August 19, 1532.  And, on April 26, 1637, the church was consecrated.  (Those Roman Catholic churches keep some meticulous records.)

The open expanse of the former Les Halles markets provides plenty of room to back way up and really see the church.  The interior of the church seems vast, maybe because the ceiling is over 100′ high.

Saint-Eustache’s organ has 8,000 pipes.  The church regularly holds organ concerts on Sundays at 5:30pm (except for special days).  When planning your trip, check the website to confirm concert times.

Architectural Style:

  • The current awe-inspiring church is generally in the late Gothic style with Renaissance features.

Interesting Facts:

  • Here in 1649, Louis XIV received his first communion.
  • Hector Berlioz’s “Te Deum” premiered here on April 30, 1855.
  • La Fontaine, the famous fable writer, is interred in Saint-Eustache.
  • During the Revolution, it was designated the Temple of Agriculture and used as a barn.

Super Cool Extra:

Getting There:

Address:  2 impasse Saint-Eustache, 75001
Nearest Métro:  Les Halles
RER:  Chatelet – Les Halles
Official websitehttp://saint-eustache.org/
Admission fee:  No

12.  Église Saint-Sulpice

saint-sulpice facade with fountain in front

Église Saint-Sulpice is one of the awe-inspiring churches of Paris.  One, because it is one of the biggest in Paris.  Two, because it looks different from the others.  Three, because the South tower remains incomplete due to a stop in construction during the French Revolution – and it never resumed.  Four, because the grand organ, well, is pretty grand.  And, five, because the square out in front is so relaxing and such a good place to admire the church and listen to the water cascading in the huge fountain in the middle.

Like nearly all of the other awe-inspiring churches, this site has a long history with the Roman Catholic faith.  The current church, which was begun in 1646, is built on earlier foundations.  It is also home to three murals by Eugène Delacroix.  Look for them on the right, in the first side chapel.

Check for organ concerts on the website.  Each Sunday the church gives mass at 11:00am and 6:45pm.  For 10-15 minutes before the each of those masses, the great organ is played.  (There is a choir organ as well.)  Also, the great organ is played during mass and for 30 minutes after the 11:00am mass.

Across the square, just off the right corner if you are looking out of the front door of the church, is a great place for a macaroon.  Stop in at the famous patisserie, Pierre Hermé, at 72 rue Bonaparte, 75006.

Architectural Style:

  • Kind of a combination of Neo-Classical and Baroque with an Italianate facade.

Interesting Facts:

  • Parts of the Da Vinci Code were filmed here.
  • The Marquis de Sade was baptized here in 1740.
  • Victor Hugo was married here in 1822.

Getting There:

Address:  2 rue Palatine, 75006, on Place Saint-Sulpice
Nearest Métro:  Saint-Sulpice
Official websitehttp://pss75.fr/saint-sulpice-paris/
Admission fee:  No

13.  Église du Dôme (or Église Royale) at Les Invalides – the Boulanger’s Dozen of the Awe-Inspiring Churches in Paris

Eglise du Dome Les Invalides

Louis XIV commissioned Jules Hardouin Mansart to design and build this royal chapel that qualifies as one of the awe-inspiring churches of Paris.  The Église du Dôme was built between 1677 and 1706 and it is a stunner inside and out.

Yet, the monarchy did not survive.  During the Revolution, this grand building became the Temple of Mars.  Later, while Napoleon I reigned as Emperor, the building was a pantheon to military greats and many military officers are interred here.

Napoleon I was exiled and died on St. Helena.  But he would again leave a permanent impression on the Temple of Mars.  King Louis-Philippe decided that Napoleon I’s body should be given a place of honor beneath the great dome.  After many years of extensive work, the magnificent space was ready to hold its intended imperial remains.  When everything was ready, Napoleon I was given a state funeral and placed in his eternal tomb under a golden dome.

Along with Napoleon I, his son, Napoleon II (also known as l’Aiglon), the King of Rome, is interred here – without his heart or intestines.  And, Napoleon’s brothers, Joseph Bonaparte and Jérôme Bonaparte can be found as well.

Beyond the royal chapel, you can see the Cathédral of Saint-Louis des Invalides, which is also known as the Veteran’s chapel.  Through a glass partition between the two churches, look for flags (or trophies) taken from the vanquished that now hang from the gleaming white stone walls.

Architectural Style:

  • French Baroque

Interesting Fact:

  • The amount of gold on the dome is enough to make this qualify as one of the awe-inspiring churches of Paris.  In 1989 it took more than 26 pounds of gold for leafing that glistening dome.

Getting There:

Address:  In the Invalides complex.  The facade faces avenue de Tourville, 75007
Nearest Métro:  La Tour-Maubourg or Varenne  (the Invalides RER and Métro stop will put you near the river and it is a long walk to get to the church.)
Official websitehttp://www.musee-armee.fr/en/collections/museum-spaces/dome-des-invalides-tomb-of-napoleon-i.html
Admission fee:  Yes
No longer a consecrated church

Useful Terms – Spoken Like a Native

Useful Terms – Spoken Like a Native

Useful terms are something everyone visiting a foreign country needs.  If for nothing else, to find the bathroom.  But, knowing a few other words for food and drinks will at least take care of basic needs.  I just finished a page on useful terms and want to share the story of how it came about.

New Site

If you don’t know it by now, this is a new website/blog/creation.  After finally going live a few weeks ago, pages still need to be finalized – all while writing new blog entries and triple checking what is up and how it looks.  Lots and lots of writing, revising, tweaking appearance of the pages, increasing page load speeds, making sure keywords are used, etc…  So many words are used that I have never heard of describing things I never thought of.

Food and Drink is a “main menu item.”  That means it has several “pages” under it.  (I am probably getting all of this wrong.)  And, while working on the pages under the Food and Drink main menu, it seemed like providing some useful terms would be a good idea.  After all, this site, pariswithscott.com, is to try to help first time visitors or people who want to visit Paris on their own be able to do it.

Basic Useful Terms for Food

So, I made a list of super basic terms.  Not many, real basic food terms.  Just so looking at a menu posted outside of a restaurant may not be completely out of the question.  While doing that, I started to sound out the French words and write in my own pronunciation guide!!  As if I know how to tell someone how to say something in French!!!

Words like temperatures for cooking a steak for “steak frites.”  Medium-rare is “à point” (ah-pwahw), medium is “cuit” (kwee), well done is “bien cuit” (bee-iahn-kwee).  (I don’t think the French really know how to cook something “bien cuit.”)  And on and on for me sounding out the pronunciation.

Wouldn’t It Be Great…

While writing down those pronunciations I emailed Susan, the talented woman who is working with me on the site. “Wouldn’t it be great if we could add in some way for visitors to the site to hear the word pronounced by a native French speaker?”

Well, she did it.  Susan made the page absolutely incredible!!!  Take a look and a listen here:

https://pariswithscott.com/food-and-drink-in-paris/french-pronunciation-guide-with-audio/

The internet is incredible.  Useful terms are great, but hearing them, while seeing the word, is really great.  Okay, that is it.  This entry is a thank you to Susan!

Subscribe If You Want

If you want to sign up for the newsletter, feel free.  I’m trying to write entries and every now and then they will be emailed out to you if you subscribe.  And, always happy to hear suggestions on making it better.  Just went live not too long ago and still getting things worked out.  This is kind of a preview for you.

Thanks for taking a look.

Parlez-vous français?

A Step Inside Giacometti’s Studio

A Step Inside Giacometti’s Studio

More than 50 years after his death, Alberto Giacometti’s studio in Paris has been reassembled and is open for you to visit.  You will find it about a mile from his original studio, in the same Montparnasse neighborhood.

Forethought to Preserve an Artist’s Legacy

When he died in 1966, Giacometti’s studio of 40 years was disassembled by his wife, Annette.  She removed all of the artist’s works in progress, furnishings and even the walls to preserve them.  Annette had the forethought, and somehow knew, that Giacometti’s studio should be saved for the future.

Eventually, Giacometti’s studio and artwork, notebooks, sketchbooks and all kinds of things Giacometti, was left by Annette in 1993 to the Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti.  The Foundation runs the Giacometti Institute and that organization, “is the reference place for Giacometti’s work and an art history center including exhibitions, research and pedagogy.”

Reconstruction of Giacometti’s Studio

In furtherance of its mission, Giacometti’s studio was reconstructed.  Using old photographs of Giacometti’s studio by Robert Doisneau, Gordon Parks, Sabine Weiss and Ernst Scheidegger the Giacometti Institute rebuilt the studio just as it had been.  At only 15′ x 16′, you wouldn’t think it could hold much.  But, like his skeletal sculptures, Giacometti’s studio is powerful and full of the artist’s presence.

The website explains that now the Giacometti Institute has on permanent display, “Giacometti’s reconstructed studio including his furniture, personal objects, walls painted by the artist and exclusive works, some of which have never before been exhibited.”

Giacometti’s Studio Housed in Art-Deco

The Giacometti Foundation decided to place the institute in a 1914 Art-Deco building with a famous history of its own.  Paul Follot, the renowned Art-Deco artist and interior designer had his showroom in the building.  (Super-cool!)

Of course, the 3,700 square foot space needed lots of work to make it a suitable place for the Institute.  Pascal Grasso, the architect working on the restoration and renovation, had three objectives, “respect the historic monument and give Giacometti’s work pride of place, while devising a contemporary space endowed with its own identity.”

The foundation’s collection is the largest holding of artwork by Alberto Giacometti.  It includes hundreds of sculptures, nearly 100 paintings and thousands of drawings, etchings and engravings.  Some of these can be seen on a visit to the institute.

Breaking Many Banks

Alberto Giacometti’s sculptures are some of the most recognizable in the world – and the most expensive.  “Chariot,” a breathtaking 1950 bronze by Alberto Giacometti, sold for nearly US$101 Million in 2014.  And, in 2015, the spaghetti-string armed, “Pointing Man,” sold for over US$141 Million.  That set a world record for a sculpture at auction.

Alberto Giacometti "Chariot"

“Chariot” by Alberto Giacometti

Want to see a current major exhibition of Alberto Giacometti’s work in the United States?  Visit the Guggenheim in New York through September 12, 2018.

Quotes are from the Fondation Giacometti website.

Giacometti’s Studio
Address:  Inside the Institute Giacometti, 5, Rue Victor Schoelcher, 75014 Paris
Nearest Métro:  Raspail or Denfert-Rochereau
RER:  Line B, Stop: Denfert-Rochereau
Official websitehttp://www.fondation-giacometti.fr/en
Hours:   Open by online reservation system only.  Tuesday from 2:00pm – 6:00pm and Wednesday – Sunday 10:00am – 6:00pm.
Closed:  Monday all day and Tuesday mornings.
Admission charge:  Yes